Our Projects

Capacity Building in Water Quality Monitoring and Surveillance in Ghana

Water, forests, and minerals are interdependent. They are physically linked, for instance, in that minerals are found in forests and watersheds. Without water, forests cannot grow. Forests regulate water flows and act as barriers to coastal and river floods. Forests also contribute to climatic stability through carbon sequestration, which then stabilizes water supply. Because of such close linkages, the exploitation of one can lead to the degradation of another.

 

Water is essential to life on our planet. A prerequisite of sustainable development must be to ensure uncontaminated streams, rivers, lakes and oceans. There is growing public concern about the condition of fresh water in Ghana. Mining affects fresh water through heavy use of water in processing ore, and through water pollution from discharged mine effluent and seepage from tailings and waste rock impoundments. Increasingly, human activities such as mining threaten the water sources on which we all depend. Water resources have been called “mining’s most common casualty”. There is growing awareness of the environmental legacy of mining activities that have been undertaken with little concern for the environment. The price we have paid for our everyday use of minerals has sometimes been very high. Mining by its nature consumes, diverts and can seriously pollute water resources.

Date: November 2015

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Participants of the just-ended Mole XXII Conference at

22nd Mole Conference to discuss decentralised WASH services delivery

22nd Mole Conference to discuss decentralised WASH services delivery

The 22nd edition of the longest running annual Water,

Our Partners

Water Aid
Unicef
IRC
Government of Ghana
European Union
Canadian International Development Agency